Deep dips - yes/no ?

bulatka

New member
Posts: 1
Hello, i have a question. Are deep dips generally "bad technique" and everyone should do them around 90 degree at elbows, or it depends from person to person ? I have good dips technique, but i dont know how deep should i do them. I can go really deep, below 90 degree and feeling big pec stretch without discomfort in my shoulders, i dont go fast,controlled. When i do 90 degree, definitelly smaller stretch, but i guess its safer. So can i go deep (i guess bigger gainz from bigger stretch and range of motion) or should i go around those 90 degree at elbow (safer position) ? Ty
 

Damer

Administrator
DAREBEE Team
Warrior Monk from Terra
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 598
@bulatka Welcome to the Hive. :LOL: During dips, the shoulder joint goes through a large arc of motion, requiring stabilization and support from muscles like the deltoids and scapula. Everyone has different strength and weaknesses but generally speaking by going past the 90 degree angle at the elbow and adding volume (as in a lot of reps) you make it more likely that an injury can occur and the benefits of going that deep are not well documented so in all likelihood the cons here outweigh the pros. I hope this helps.
 

Skal1agrim

Member
Posts: 12
Just to clarify, bulatka and Damer, are you referring to dips performed on parallel bars or with one's palms against given surface behind the back (like in most Darebee dip illustrations)? Is there a difference in the (dis)advantages of deep dips depending on the exercise variation?
 

Damer

Administrator
DAREBEE Team
Warrior Monk from Terra
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 598
@Skal1agrim I am really sorry I am only now getting to your question. It's been a crazy week! OK, the answer is it depends. It depends on your own physiology, shoulder strength and athletic capability. The science we do have on this however shows when it comes to upper body, in particular, full range of motion (ROM) movements do not offer any significant benefits when it comes to strength and hypertrophy. A scientific review of several studies that confirmed this is found here. In addition, from an orthopedic point of view, the shoulder joint is particularly vulnerable. It is made up of two joints, basically, and it is shallow and it depends on the rotator cuff for stability and that can be easily inflamed and damaged so, individual differences and capabilities aside, I'd say we err on the side of caution and say no to deep dips or ROM on bench dips too. I hope this helps.
 

Skal1agrim

Member
Posts: 12
Thanks for this answer, Damer! It really makes sense, and offers a good caution against a "gotta go all the way" impulse I can tap into with my workouts sometime. Just anecdotally of course, I always feel a good muscle activation in my lower pecs whenever I go even slightly "deep" on the bench bars, as in moving my elbow hinge below a 90 degree angle. I think I'll continue to perform dips like this (with caution) at a relatively low rep range (3 sets of 15 or so) given my shoulder strength and overall athletic ability. As you said, everything in fitness comes down to one's own physiology, but I really appreciate your getting back to me with a solid all-around answer and recent supporting research. Oh, and I don't by any means consider a 2 day response window to be anything out of the ordinary, much less a late reply, so no worries there!! Thanks for all the work and expertise you put into to the Darebee site and community. I'm really looking forward to using the Powerbuilder and Extreme HIIT programs in the coming months.
 
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