Help! Recommendations for fixed dumbbell sizes/brand

n8thegr8

New member
Posts: 1
Hi everyone!

I have been wanting to get into strength training and wondered what sizes I should get for home. It seems like the full dumbbell sets are excessive (and super expensive), while the rack-able dumbbell sets can get a bit unwieldy. So, I was looking at getting two or three pairs of fixed dumbbells and was hoping you guys could help me steer me in the right directions for weight sizes and solid brands. I like the rubber-style ends to keep things quiet and have the floors safe if dropped.

What do you guys think?
 

Fremen

Well-known member
Shaman from Italy
Posts: 3,274
"“Keep an eye on the staircases. They like to change.” Percy Weasley, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone."
Maybe consider kettlebells too, you can do the same exercises and many more specific ones and you can use them with one or two hands :)
I had bought a very compact case for weights, it was entry level but it did its job and took up very little space, like this:
kit-manubri-bodybuilding-20kg-filettati.jpg
 

lofivelcro

Well-known member
Hunter from the sticks
Posts: 593
"Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today"
I wouldn't buy fixed dumbbells. You can progress pretty quickly through those if you choose weights that are close to each other, for a safe progression, and if you don't, the progression won't be as safe any more. If you still want fixed ones, it might help to know what you're starting with in terms of strength, what your goals are, and what kind of workout you want to do.

Adjustable ones like what @Fremen has posted is the way to go, imo, also I found that the screws of that particular set loosen very quickly and you have to tighten them a lot, depending on the exercise, but maybe that's only mine. The obvious advantage is that you can progress safer, and you can buy more weights when you've reached the highest weight with the set.

You can also look for used sets. Try to avoid those plastic ones filled with sand(?) and try to get those made out of iron.
 

Shikari

Well-known member
Mystic from R'lyeh
Posts: 83
"The wind breathes where it wills and you hear its sound, but you don’t know where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit"
I think I have the exact same set as @Fremen . Same kit.

The screws do loosen, but it helps if you give the weights a twist in opposite directions once the screws are tight. It locks them down pretty well.

I bought a couple sets of 25# plates over time as well.

They work for me because the "cut outs" make good grips for goblet squats, one/two arm Russian swings, etc.

Not a big fan of rubber coating on weights. I advise approaching weight lifting mindfully. I believe it's when people overestimate what they can lift or how many reps/sets they can do that accidents happen, including damaged floors. You've prly seen videos where the person basically drops the barbell after a set of heavy shoulder presses for example. It looks badass in videos, but I think it can lead to sloppy habits. Lowering the weight slowly to the ground or rack increases the time under tension and also builds your strength. There's a lot of research to that effect.
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20230111-174828~2.png
    Screenshot_20230111-174828~2.png
    486.4 KB · Views: 3
Last edited:

Shikari

Well-known member
Mystic from R'lyeh
Posts: 83
"The wind breathes where it wills and you hear its sound, but you don’t know where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the Spirit"
I find that it works. Tighten the screws all the way: then, holding the weights, turn the weights in opposite directions. It locks them in for me.
 

Andi64

Well-known member
from Margareten
Posts: 103
I live in a small apartment, so fixed dumbells are out of the question. Here is what I have been working with the last 20+ years:


dumbells.jpg

The springs are very convenient. A lot faster than the screws and when I do overhead triceps extensions I double up the upper one just to be on the safe side.
The plates on the bars are 1,25kg(2,7lbs) and 2,5kg (5,5lbs) the bar is 2kg (4,4lbs), so they are 9.5 kg each. The plates on the stack are 4x5kg (11lbs) and 2x 10kg (22lbs). All in all I can do 2x 29,5kg(65lbs). Which is ok for shrugs, farmers walk ...
 
Last edited:
Top